01 Oct 14 @ 8:30 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog

fatherlordspookoz:

What if Zuko is the last Gaang member alive and he lingers around the group’s memorial before saying “Keep running, I’ll capture you all one of these days”

WHY WOULD YOU DO THIS

01 Oct 14 @ 8:26 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog

janemba:

thisbridgecalledmyback:

comfy-couture:

sonofbaldwin:

jessehimself:

Do not test Reza Aslan.

We must train and retain our ability to listen and process critically.

Nobody told me that @RezaAslan knew how to read.

(Not read as in books, but read as in reveal your scalp to the world.)

Because homie read Bill Maher, Don Lemon, Alisyn Camerota, Benjamin Netanyahu, and just about everyone else for points.

Hair all over the damn floor like it was a barbershop and nobody had a broom.

He got ALL his kee-kee’s in.

Watch.

Transcription available here: http://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2014/09/30/reza_aslan_mahers_facile_generalizations_of_islam_the_definition_of_bigotry.html

🙊

YAAAS

reza always goes awf

01 Oct 14 @ 8:00 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog

Funny. I guess destiny isn’t the path chosen for us, but the path we chose for ourselves.

01 Oct 14 @ 7:00 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog

ktshy:

archiemcphee:

Let’s check in on the decadent, completely inedible, yet perfectly wearable shoes from The Shoe Bakery (previously featured here). The Orlando, Florida-based company is run by Chris Campbell, who loves both shoes and sweets so much that he decided to combine them in the form of outrageously tantalizing ice cream, cake and donut-themed footwear.

If you’ve got a specific dessert and shoe combination in mind, Campbell happily accepts custom orders. Each mouthwatering pair of Shoe Bakery shoes takes about 3-6 weeks to design, create and ship. Prices range from $200 to $400 US, which should provide you with all the more incentive to refrain from trying to eat them.

Visit The Shoe Bakery’s website to check out more of their enticingly iced footwear.

[via Design Taxi]

:O

01 Oct 14 @ 5:30 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog
handmadepride:

Click here for more cool stuff.

handmadepride:

Click here for more cool stuff.

01 Oct 14 @ 4:00 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog

fashion-runways:

TONY WARD Couture 2015

01 Oct 14 @ 2:30 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog

My mother once told me that trauma is like Lord of the Rings. You go through this crazy, life-altering thing that almost kills you (like say having to drop the one ring into Mount Doom), and that thing by definition cannot possibly be understood by someone who hasn’t gone through it. They can sympathize sure, but they’ll never really know, and more than likely they’ll expect you to move on from the thing fairly quickly. And they can’t be blamed, people are just like that, but that’s not how it works.

Some lucky people are like Sam. They can go straight home, get married, have a whole bunch of curly headed Hobbit babies and pick up their gardening right where they left off, content to forget the whole thing and live out their days in peace. Lots of people however, are like Frodo, and they don’t come home the same person they were when they left, and everything is more horrible and more hard then it ever was before. The old wounds sting and the ghost of the weight of the one ring still weighs heavy on their minds, and they don’t fit in at home anymore, so they get on boats go sailing away to the Undying West to look for the sort of peace that can only come from within. Frodos can’t cope, and most of us are Frodos when we start out.

But if we move past the urge to hide or lash out, my mother always told me, we can become Pippin and Merry. They never ignored what had happened to them, but they were malleable and receptive to change. They became civic leaders and great storytellers; they we able to turn all that fear and anger and grief into narratives that others could delight in and learn from, and they used the skills they had learned in battle to protect their homeland. They were fortified by what had happened to them, they wore it like armor and used it to their advantage.

It is our trauma that turns us into guardians, my mother told me, it is suffering that strengthens our skin and softens our hearts, and if we learn to live with the ghosts of what had been done to us, we just may be able to save others from the same fate.

— S.T.Gibson (via sarahtaylorgibson)
01 Oct 14 @ 1:01 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog

tbh, I like atla more, but I never cared half as much about Aang as I do about korra

01 Oct 14 @ 12:20 pm  —  reblog
Some contextual points on Hong Kong.

ellewcee:

I’ve been on vacation and am returning to the real world now, and I’m sure what I’m about to write will be repetitive for some. But I can’t not write it, and I hope that you share it because tomorrow, October 1, has the potential to be a historic day for Hong Kong, good or bad.

You have probably heard about the protests going on in Hong Kong. I won’t revisit the general history or most recent events. Instead I wanted to post some important historical and contextual points that are significant to how we understand the particular conflict that’s taking place right now.

This is a long post, and far from comprehensive because I am only human and exhausted at that, but please bear with me.

WHY HONG KONG IS NOT THE SAME AS CHINA

  1. Hong Kong was a fishing village on a goddamn rock when it was annexed by the British in 1842. The population grew and exploded during the 20th century as a result of a number of factors, but a huge one is the creation of the People’s Republic of China (PRC). During the Chinese civil war and subsequent purging, thousands fled the violence by escaping to Hong Kong — including both sets of grandparents in my family. One was a Western car dealer in Shanghai; the other was from a landowning family. FWIW, I still have some distant relatives from the latter side in China. I have no living relatives in China on my maternal grandparents’ side. Everyone was killed.
  2. Throughout the 20th century, Hong Kong flourished, grew, and developed a distinctive culture and economy. I’m not saying everything was rosy as an English colony. I’m saying the culture and economy are real and independent from China.
  3. The events of Tiananmen may seem like they were a long time ago, and have entered history as the kind of event that’s lost its shock over time. But twenty-five years is a short time for many Hong Kongers, and Tiananmen’s outcome was far from predictable at that time. Remember that Tiananmen was only eight years before the handover. Imagine watching the coverage that summer and knowing that was to be your government soon.
  4. All of this is to give just a bit of history as to why I and many others say: Hong Kong people do not consider themselves to be the same as mainland Chinese. When I say I’m from Hong Kong, I mean that. It is not the same.

WHO IS PROTESTING AND WHY 

  1. During the handover, dates were set for universal suffrage. Those promises are looking pretty damn compromised in the latest announcements from Beijing. You can read more about that in literally any article on the events; I won’t dive into it here.
  2. The main groups of activists engaging in the protests are students, and Occupy Central. Most articles I have read from Western news sources emphasize the role of OC, and they are not insignificant. But keep in mind: the students began to boycott school in the face of those changes from Beijing. They did it because student politics is a real movement in Hong Kong. It’s their future and they know it. Their parents know that Tiananmen was powered by students. My mother, who lives in Hong Kong, says that on the first day of student protests, their parents were out on the street with water, chargers, etc, because they saw Tiananmen and understand their kids’ fears: they fear the lack of a future
  3. Occupy Central is not the same as the other occupy movements we’ve seen around the world. Please do not confuse the goals of this movement with the goals of other Occupys. This is about democracy and representation. If I see any anti-capitalist leftist co-optation of the movement in Hong Kong in the Western coverage, I am going to flip my shit, and I say that as someone sympathetic to and supportive of Occupy in general. Do not get it twisted.
  4. The protesters have been keeping the streets clean — removing garbage and recycling; sweeping; using public toilets; etc. There is no black bloc-style activity that I’ve heard of. They have agreed to create “humanitarian corridors” to let ambulances move through because the government alleged that the protests were a safety hazard. These things are not just a cute feature of the protests. They are a manifestation of the love we have our city, and they are also strategic politicking. If you are clean, apologetic, peaceful, unarmed, and responsive, they lose some of their very tenuous foundation for saying the protests are wrong. I’m not advocating for this as the only route to change. I’m just pointing out the tactic.

THE VERY REAL THREAT OF VIOLENCE

  1. Tomorrow (Wednesday October 1) is National Day for China, the commemoration of the creation of the People’s Republic of China. Tens of thousands, if not a hundred thousand, citizens are projected to protest tomorrow on a day set aside for celebrating China and the party.
  2. Also worth noting: loads of tourists from mainland China are coming to Hong Kong to see the fireworks and enjoy the holiday. Tourism from mainland has boomed in the past decade — only this month, they came to shop and instead saw peaceful civil disobedience
  3. State violence against its citizens is not an idle threat when you are dealing with the PRC. We are talking about a serious, real threat here. Tear gas has not been deployed in Hong Kong in decades. The use of it this weekend, the dragging and arresting of teenagers, the police in riot gear, is a big, big deal. It is a shock to the system for Hong Kong people to see peaceful protestors be treated the same as the Uighur population in China, or Tibet. 
  4. There are a few things that continue to restrain Beijing from bringing down the hammer. The incredible damage it would do to international finance is one thing. Media attention is another. Note that foreign media outlets covering China have been based out of Hong Kong for decades, due to restrictions from Beijing. The PRC knows better than most how bad they will look if they crack down violently. Tiananmen was a PR catastrophe for the government, and back then the 24 hour cable news cycle was still being born. 

Hong Kong is 12 hours ahead of EST. I feel hopeless, thrilled, scared; I feel that we are facing something totally unprecedented. I know that the people who are out on the street know what the possibilities are. I am heartburstingly proud. 

Do not look away.

01 Oct 14 @ 12:03 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog
01 Oct 14 @ 12:01 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog
#/sighs/  

dropped it

01 Oct 14 @ 11:59 am  —  reblog
01 Oct 14 @ 11:30 am  —  via + org  —  reblog

not sure if i should drop my third class. i need to decide tonight. It’ll double my workload and I’m interested in the class, but I’m afraid it’ll overwhelm me.

But i have a feeling all of that free time is going to go toward freaking out about korra and then re-beating skyward sword for the hell of it.

01 Oct 14 @ 10:51 am  —  reblog
Bring me the horizon

[a/n]: otherwise known as the pirate au. I will be posting it to ff.net, in addition to this site.

~

PART ONE: Rouge Waves

01 Oct 14 @ 1:53 am  —  reblog
OS